Verb Tense
Definition

The Four Principal Parts of a Verb

Simple Past Past Participle Present Participle (-ing form)

Past Participle

The past participle form of a verb also expresses action that occurred in the past. However, unlike the past tense, the past participle indicates that the action is complete.

You can easily identify the past participle by putting the helping verb had before the verb and then choosing the correct form.

Regular verbs form the past partciple by adding -ed to the simple form, so the past tense and the past participle of a regular verb are the same.

Irregular verbs may form the past participle form by changing the spelling completely—or not at all!

Regular Verbs
Simple Past Past Participle
slip slipped (had) slipped
open opened (had) opened
type typed (had) typed
    
Irregular Verbs
Simple Past Past Participle
drink drank (had) drunk
eat ate (had) eaten
drive drove (had) driven

Present Participle (-ing form)
The present participle describes action that is ongoing or continuing. The present participle is formed by adding -ing to the simple form. The present participle does not change regardless of whether the verb is regular or irregular.

  Simple Past Past Participle Present Participle (-ing)
Regular Verbs open opened (had) opened opening
type typed (had) typed typing
Irregular Verbs eat ate (had) eaten eating
drive drove (had) driven driving

Here's a simple formula to help you identify the principal parts of any verb: